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romantic_epistemology [2021/03/14 21:41]
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romantic_epistemology [2021/03/14 21:44] (current)
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   * My hypothesis will, therefore, be thus expressed, that the constituent forces of life in the human living body are—first, the power of length, or REPRODUCTION; second, the power of surface (that is, length and breadth), or IRRITABILITY; third, the power of depth, or SENSIBILITY. With this observation I may conclude these remarks, only reminding the reader that Life itself is neither of these separately, but the copula of all three…(Theory of Life) (Here we can also see the interchange between Schelling and Andreas Röschlaub in Germany in the context of Romantic medicine).   * My hypothesis will, therefore, be thus expressed, that the constituent forces of life in the human living body are—first, the power of length, or REPRODUCTION; second, the power of surface (that is, length and breadth), or IRRITABILITY; third, the power of depth, or SENSIBILITY. With this observation I may conclude these remarks, only reminding the reader that Life itself is neither of these separately, but the copula of all three…(Theory of Life) (Here we can also see the interchange between Schelling and Andreas Röschlaub in Germany in the context of Romantic medicine).
  
-  * The study of sensibility gives rise to the issue of mind and consciousness. As a medical colleague lectured in this regard, the ‘ultimate end of organic nature is presented in the achievement of that sensibility ... by which the animal exists from itself, in itself, and, though imperfectly, for itself .... Now, this position is the same as to assert that a mind must be added to life, and consequently, that a transition from life to mind . . . must be assumed.’((Coleridge's Manuscript Essay on the Passions, Edward E. Bostetter, J.of Hist. of Ideas, Jan-Mar 1970, Vol 31, Issue I, pp. 99-108)+  * The study of sensibility gives rise to the issue of mind and consciousness. As a medical colleague lectured in this regard, the ‘ultimate end of organic nature is presented in the achievement of that sensibility ... by which the animal exists from itself, in itself, and, though imperfectly, for itself .... Now, this position is the same as to assert that a mind must be added to life, and consequently, that a transition from life to mind . . . must be assumed.’((Coleridge's Manuscript Essay on the Passions, Edward E. Bostetter, J.of Hist. of Ideas, Jan-Mar 1970, Vol 31, Issue I, pp. 99-108))
  
 Coleridge also sees that the instincts - hunger, thirst, mating - motivate growth and evolve into higher powers, the most important being that of desire which 'has something of the quality of the concept of imagination". Coleridge also sees that the instincts - hunger, thirst, mating - motivate growth and evolve into higher powers, the most important being that of desire which 'has something of the quality of the concept of imagination".
romantic_epistemology.1615758074.txt.gz · Last modified: 2021/03/14 21:41 by admin